• Users Online: 206
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Contacts Login 
MEDICINE AND SOCIETY
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 172-175

Using non-communicable disease clinics for tobacco cessation: A promising perspective


Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012, India

Correspondence Address:
Sonu Goel
Department of Community Medicine and School of Public Health, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-258X.255763

Globally, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are responsible for 38 million (68%) of the world’s 56 million deaths, of which 28 million occur in low- and middle-income countries. Tobacco use is a major preventable and modifiable behavioural risk factor for NCDs. It takes annually a toll of over 7 million people and by 2030, it is anticipated to kill over 8 million people every year. Internationally, WHO has advocated the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and MPOWER policy to combat the tobacco epidemic. As part of its global commitment towards tobacco control, the Government of India has enacted a comprehensive law, namely Cigarette and Other Tobacco Products Act, in 2003, for governing tobacco control in the country followed by launching of the National Tobacco Control Programme for its effective implementation along with strengthening of tobacco cessation facilities at national and sub-national levels. As per the National Programme for Prevention and Control of Cancers, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases and Stroke, there is a provision of screening of risk factors for NCDs (including tobacco) besides providing treatment and behavioural advice for NCDs. However, presently, tobacco cessation services for NCD patients are under-utilized, probably due to lack of a skilled and dedicated workforce. Delivery of effective patient-centric, disease-specific, culturally sensitive tobacco cessation services at an NCD clinic might efficiently reduce complications of NCDs among patients using tobacco and might further reduce morbidity and mortality attributable to NCDs in India.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1332    
    Printed29    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded258    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal