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MEDICAL EDUCATION
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 296-300

Early clinical exposure through a vertical integration programme in physiology


1 Department of Physiology, St John’s Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Paediatric Nephrology, St John’s Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Gastroenterology, St John’s Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Neurology, St John’s Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India
5 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical care, St John’s Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India
6 Department of Internal Medicine, St John’s Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India
7 Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, St John’s Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
D Savitha
Department of Physiology, St John’s Medical College, John Nagar, Bengaluru 560034, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-258X.261191

Background. Early clinical exposure is likely to be beneficial during the preclinical year. This pilot programme aimed to define a learning framework of introducing first year medical students to early clinical exposure through a vertical integration programme in the physiology course. The intent was to enhance the understanding of theoretical concepts and practical applications of physiology. Student and faculty perceptions were evaluated. Methods. First year MBBS students (n = 60) had bedside clinics conducted by 5 clinical departments, where the clinical context and applied physiological concepts were emphasized. Clinical sessions were synchronized with pedagogic highlights on related physiological concepts. The student’s perceptions were recorded through a semi-structured questionnaire, while qualitative feedback was obtained from the faculty. Results. All students ( 100%) reported that the programme was relevant and did not interfere with their physiology course. Most (91%) appreciated the synchronization of classroom knowledge with clinical exposures, and thought that integrated teaching helped in better understanding of practical applications of physiology (94%) with adequate discussions during the sessions (91 %). Fifty-nine (98%) students preferred integrated teaching over the isolated traditional classroom teaching. The clinicians involved also felt that the early clinical exposure was relevant. The students achieved a mean (SD) score of 13 (2.98) of 25 in the quiz consisting of multiple-choice questions that attempted to test their learning through early clinical exposures. Conclusion. This pilot exercise showed the utility of early clinical exposure integrated into the physiology course. It will be worthwhile to replicate this exercise at other institutions and among a larger student strength.


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