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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 262-267

Effectiveness of education and antibiotic control programme at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi


1 Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India
2 Department of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India
3 Department of Biostatistics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029, India

Correspondence Address:
Naveet Wig
Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110029
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-258X.261176

Background. We aimed to assess the impact of antibiotic optimization education along with understanding the antibiogram on antibiotic-prescribing practices, antibiotic consumption, antimicrobial resistance and cost of antibiotics in a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi. Methods. We divided the study into 3 phases—before and after intervention and a phase of education in between. We collected data on demographics, indication for antibiotic prescription, appropriateness or reasons for inappropriate antibiotic uses, antibiotic consumption (i.e. the rate and duration of antibiotic use), bacterial resistance and antibiotic cost. Interventions included education, introduction of an antibiogram and use of antibiotic prescription forms. Similar data were collected for the post-interventional phase. The study was conducted at the Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. Results. There was an improvement in the number of patients who underwent de-escalation of antibiotics, 21/100 v. 36/100 (p = 0.019); appropriate antibiotic usage, 25/ 100 v. 46/100 (p = 0.002); switching from intravenous to oral promptly, 16/52 v. 1 9/36 (p = 0.003) and decrease in expenditure, ₹24 207.5 v. ₹16 51 7.5 per patient (p = 0.001 ); in the post-interventional phase. Significant reductions in the incidence of infections due to Acinetobacter (60% v. 31%; p<0.001) and improvement in sensitivity pattern with cephalosporin sulbactam (80% v. 100%; p<0.001) were seen. Multivariate analysis revealed that Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) score, hospital stay <10 days, ventilator-associated pneumonia and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus coverage were independent predictors of mortality with odds ratio of 1.14, 0.1, 9.7 and 1.14, respectively. Conclusion. Education and an antibiotic control programme constituted an effective and cost-saving strategy to optimise antibiotic use at a tertiary care centre.


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