• Users Online: 468
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Contacts Login 


 
 Table of Contents  
BOOK REVIEW
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 360-361

New Directions in Geriatric Medicine: Concepts, trends, and evidence-based practice


Department of Geriatric Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Date of Web Publication16-Aug-2018

Correspondence Address:
A B Dey
Department of Geriatric Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-258X.239088


How to cite this article:
Dey A B. New Directions in Geriatric Medicine: Concepts, trends, and evidence-based practice. Natl Med J India 2017;30:360-1

How to cite this URL:
Dey A B. New Directions in Geriatric Medicine: Concepts, trends, and evidence-based practice. Natl Med J India [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Feb 20];30:360-1. Available from: http://www.nmji.in/text.asp?2017/30/6/360/239088



Lee Ann Lindquist. Springer, Switzerland, 2016. 159pp, price not mentioned. ISBN 978–3–319–28135–3.



Geriatric medicine is one of the most complex specialties in medicine. Older patients invariably harbour one or more non-communicable diseases, designated by the WHO as public health priorities. These include diabetes, hypertension and heart diseases, stroke, cancer, and chronic lung diseases. In addition, mental health problems such as depression and dementia are also common in old age. Osteoarthritis and osteoporosis are important causes of disability. In the very old and bed-bound, multiple of these conditions are present, affecting the individual's functional status, health service requirement, healthcare expenditure and drug consumption. A composite description of the health status of older patients would be multi-morbidity, multiple disability, poor functionality and limited access to healthcare.

In this setting, the editors have clearly defined the spectrum of readership as practitioners of internal medicine, family medicine and geriatrics located in North America. The list of contributors is an impressive one, consisting of geriatricians, public health experts, physicians, and so on. Each chapter ends with a summary and key points, which are useful for the reader. One cannot but appreciate chapters such as ‘Older adults and driving’, ‘Can dementia be delayed’ and ‘To fall is human’. As a geriatrician, one often encounters these three issues. The authors have tried to make a statement that may satisfy older persons and their caregivers.

Overall, this is a good book targeted at a limited readership and should be part of a geriatric medicine library.






 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed180    
    Printed17    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded66    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]